Friday, April 16, 2010

Federal Judge Rules Day of Prayer Unconstitutional


April 15, 2010 on WVUA TV
From AP:
A federal judge in Wisconsin ruled the National Day of Prayer unconstitutional Thursday, saying the day amounts to a call for religious action.

U.S. District Judge Barbara Crabb wrote that the government can no more enact laws supporting a day of prayer than it can encourage citizens to fast during Ramadan, attend a synagogue or practice magic.
Read more

14 comments:

  1. R€LIGION $TINKS OF MONE¥April 16, 2010 at 12:58 PM

    A rather alarming development. Those Christian´s are always up to some kind of bullsh*t. What the hell was Obama thinking of?

    So it´s not enough with Christmas, Easter and all the other religious festivities like funerals etc now they need a national prayer day. 
    This constant need for continous religious manifestation and propaganda seems like it is rooted in paranoia or a lack of faith.   

    Why don´t they start filling up all those empty churches that tax payers are paying for (thanks to charity tax breaks) first.   

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  2. heh, they mispelled Obama on the news screen.

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  3. I was wondering when that would happen!  yay!! :)

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  4. No they didn't. It says Alabama's Home Team.

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  5. So the two people at the end are saying they support the NDOP and are against this ruling because NOT supporting a national prayer day "is against freedom of religion".........

    ****BOGGLE****

    Not only do these people not understand why an endorsement of religious faith by the government IS unconstitutional and against "freedom of religion" (a concept they CLEARLY have no understanding of), THEY DON'T EVEN UNDERSTAND the simple question being asked of them here! I guess that's why Alabama has like, what, the fourth lowest average IQ in the country? Props to Ms. Senthony Howard though, smart black lady in rural Alabama? Scaaaa-ryyyyy! Run girl, don't walk!

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  6. This is great! I'm so happy for atheists Dan and his wife Annie Laurie at the Freedom From Religion Foundation.  Congratulations and a big thanks!  FFRF brings lawsuits which is what it'll take to keep the wall of separation from falling.

    Quote from the April 15 FFRF news release:
    Annie Laurie Gaylor said she was "euphoric" over the decision. "It is such a profound violation of conscience for Congress to direct our president to tell all citizens to pray, and that they in fact must set aside an entire day for prayer once a year. We are so gratified and delighted that Judge Crabb in her solid decision rejected revisionist history and decided this case on the merits."
    Gaylor said the victory was particularly sweet, because this case has been the most time-consuming and difficult of the Foundation's cases. "The 1952 law was predicated on bad history -- the lie that our founders prayed at the Constitutional Convention -- and defending our lawsuit involved a major debunking of bad history presented by the Obama administration."

    For debunking the RR fake history, see the book <span>Liars For Jesus</span>  by Chris Rodda. Note the excerpt from chapter six: Did Prayer Save the Constitutional Convention.

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  7. Preventing me from forcing others to pray is against my freedom of religion!

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  8. Crap! What happened?  I only postd once--not 3 times.

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  9. I finally found a link to the official decision in the judgepedia.org article about Barbara Crabb. Amazingly, I couldn't find a link in news stories. Link to the decision.

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  10. thanks for that link man, not only was it a good read i learned alot from it too, i'm sure were gonna talk about it in class monday :)
    i got info on my side with a bunch of conservative, republican, christian students in a public school.(my class just so happens to contain alot)

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  11. Two other resources:

    The book web site for Liars For Jesus by Chris Rodda. (the <span>Liars For Jesus</span> page at amazon.com is here.)
    A very important chapter is Chapter 9 , which covers Madison's important "Detached Memoranda". I'll quote some lines from chapter nine's 1st page (available at the book's web site) where Rodda writes that: <span>"Madison made clear his objections to mixing religion and government in even the smallest ways. A few of the practices he singled out as being unconstitutional or potentially dangerous were tax supported chaplains in congress and in the military, and government proclamations of days of prayer and thanksgiving. Religious right American history authors hate this document and usually attempt to discredit it in some way before even getting to its actual content."</span>

    The online essay titled The Christian Nation Myth.

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  12. Here we go again: 3 identical comments where one was posted. ????

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  13. I like the guys that were for the National day of prayer, about the most ignorant people ever interviewed. The national day of prayer is a display of freedom of religion? Give me a break, you can still worship that day if you wish, why does the government have to be involved?

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  14. Hey Blake, i'm an alabamian too, and a proud one at that.  there have been mistakes and ignorance rampant in this state for a very long time, but we're trying to improve as quickly as we can.  we NEED smart people like Senthony to STAY in alabama and help us all improve.  talking about statewide average IQ is sort of lumping us all in a pile of stupidity and it's not appreciated.  please consider individuals on an individual basis.  war eagle and fuck bama btw. 

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